Daily Words of the Buddha for October 22, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 22, 2018  —  cariya — conduct, behavior, state of, life

Idha tappati, pecca tappati,
pāpakārī ubhayattha tappati.
“Pāpaṃ me katan”ti tappati,
bhiyyo tappati, duggatiṃ gato.

Idha nandati, pecca nandati,
katapuñño ubhayattha nandati.
“Puññaṃ me katan”ti nandati,
bhiyyo nandati, suggatiṃ gato.

Agony now, agony hereafter,
the wrong-doer suffers agony in both worlds.
Agonized now by the knowledge that one has done wrong,
one suffers more agony, gone to a state of woe.

Rejoicing now, rejoicing hereafter,
the doer of wholesome actions rejoices in both worlds.
Rejoicing now in the knowledge that one has acted rightly,
one rejoices more, gone to a state of bliss.

Dhammapada 1.17, 1.18
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

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Daily Words of the Buddha for October 21, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 21, 2018  —  pāvaka — pure, bright, clear, shining

Manopubbaṅgamā dhammā,
manoseṭṭhā manomayā.
Manasā ce paduṭṭhena
bhāsati vā karoti vā,
tato naṃ dukkhamanveti
cakkaṃva vahato padaṃ.

Manopubbaṅgamā dhammā,
manoseṭṭhā manomayā.
Manasā ce pasannena
bhāsati vā karoti vā,
tato naṃ sukhamanveti
chāyāva anapāyinī.

Mind precedes all phenomena,
mind matters most, everything is mind-made.
If with an impure mind
one performs any action of speech or body,
then suffering will follow that person
as the cartwheel follows the foot of the draught animal.

Mind precedes all phenomena,
mind matters most, everything is mind-made.
If with a pure mind
one performs any action of speech or body,
then happiness will follow that person
as a shadow that never departs.

Dhammapada 1.1, 1.2
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Theosophy | By Their Fruits (Part 1), by Raghavan Iyer

   This mergence of the Jivanmukta into Ishwara may he likened to what may happen in the case of the sun when a comet falls upon it; there is in the case of the Sun an accession of heat and light; so also, whenever any particular individual reaches the highest state of spiritual culture, develops in himself all the virtues that alone entitle him to a union with Ishwara and finally unites his soul with Ishwara, there is, as it were, a sort of reaction emanating from Ishwara for the good of humanity; and in particular cases an impulse is generated in Ishwara to incarnate for the good of humanity. This is the highest consummation of human aspiration and endeavour.

Bhavani Shankar

 

Shankaracharya, in Self-Knowledge and The Crest Jewel of Wisdom, provides a wealth of instruction about meditation and particularly the relation between Viveka or discrimination andVairagya or detachment. Anyone attempting to apply these teachings will find that it is difficult, but he will also learn that it is extremely enjoyable. If thoughtful, he will conclude that, by definition, there could not be any fixed technique of meditation upon the transcendent. Technique is as particularized a notion as one can imagine, a mechanistic term. A techne or skill has rules and can be reproduced. On the other hand, that which is transcendental cannot be reproduced. It does not manifest, and it is beyond everything that exists, so there can be no technique for meditation upon it.

Another way of putting it, an older way and perhaps less misleading, is that of the Dalai Lama in his book My Land and My People, where in a few pages he explains that the teaching of the Buddha is both wisdom and method. They go together. Wisdom is meaningless to us unless there is a method. But the method itself cannot be understood unless in relation to wisdom. He says that there is a distinction to be made between absolute truth and relative truth. In other words, wisdom is your relationship to knowledge, and that relationship involves the means you employ. It is skill in the use of what we call knowledge, but skill that is neither rigid nor final in its modes of embodiment. There is a natural allowance for growth in oneself and within others.

In this arena of inner growth, he who really knows does not tell, partly because he knows that what is essential cannot be told, in the Socratic sense in which wisdom and virtue could never be taught. But partly also he chooses not to tell when telling is of no help. The Buddha, the Master of skillful means, said that whichever way you go – telling little, telling much, or keeping quiet – in every case you have created karma. There were times when the Buddha told nothing. There were times when he told a great deal merely by telling a fairy story but saying through it much more than is ordinarily possible. There were times when he said very little, and even this sometimes became a bone of contention among disciples. We are dealing with the karma involved in human encounters, and this karma must not be physicalized and only understood literally and exoterically. That is our whole tragedy. We have a physical conception of telling and of silence, but that is because we still have not understood that the real battle is going on between that subtle and rarefied plane of consciousness where the true suns are, and that boisterous plane of consciousness which is the astral light, where there is an immense array of inverted shadows and images.

Words like “telling,” “knowing” and “being silent” have to do with inner postures. As long as we seek external representations of the inner postures of the spiritual life, the spiritual life is not for us in this incarnation, and perhaps just as well. Maybe this is where humanity has grown up. There is now no need for mollycoddling. There is no need for giving in to the residual and tragic arrogance of those who are on the verge of annihilation, by pandering to them, yielding external tokens, or performing external signs. In this Aquarian age, spiritual life is in the mind, and people have got to be much more willing to assume full responsibility for all their choices. The reading of the signs requires a deeper knowledge, or a tougher kind of integrity. The only honest position for anyone is that, given whatever one thing he really knows in his life, in terms of that he is entitled, in E.M.Forster’s phrase, “to connect” – to connect with what is told and what is not told. People are brought up in India, and indeed all over the East, to know from early on that what the eyes are saying is important, what the physical gestures are saying is important, and that ominous or peaceful silences bear meanings of many kinds. Brought up in the rich and complex poetry of silence, gesture and speech through all the seven apertures of the human face, there is no such problem as between knowing in one particular sense and telling in one particular sense.

A lot of the subtlety has gone out of our lives, probably all over the world, but nonetheless we must recognize that wisdom always implies an immense, incredible flexibility of method. Let us not play games, least of all adopt sick and self-destructive attitudes, where in the name of belittling ourselves we insidiously belittle our Teachers. What this really comes to is blackmail and bargaining and they never helped anyone. On the other hand, let us genuinely be grateful for whatever we receive at all levels. It is part of the meaning of the Guruparampara chain that if one were smart enough to be benefitted at some level and to be ever grateful to the person who first taught one the alphabet, then one is more likely to make good use of Teachers in higher realms. We are dealing with something archetypal in which our whole lives are involved, but in which each one will be unique in his or her response.

Conversely, there is nothing predictably easy about the emergence, appearance, decisions, masks and modes of any spiritual Teacher. To assume that would be to limit the Fraternity or to imagine that an organization or some individuals could make captive or bind him. The moment such a being becomes captive, as Plato pointed out in the Republic, his withdrawal or his failure is inevitable. He will be free. And what he is really doing would be known only to him. What is important is to know that existentially he will point beyond himself to the Tathagatas. It is a hard lesson for the world – especially in a worn-out West that is still fighting the Middle Ages – that a true Master is a true servant. The reason why we find it difficult, even in our everyday language, to understand what is involved in being a Master is because we have ceased to understand what is it to be a true servant. When we can restore the full meaning and the grandeur to the notion of a true and totally reliable servant, only then will we understand what is it to be a Master of Wisdom and Method. Who are the Masters? They are the Servants of mankind. Who, then, must be their agents? Those who exemplify the art of service, who are unquestioning, total, and absolute in their obedience to their Gurus.

Hermes, May 1976
Raghavan Iyer

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 20, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 20, 2018  —  upekkhā — equanimity, evenness of mind, a state of inner equipoise that cannot be upset by gain and loss, honor and dishonor, praise and blame, pleasure and pain

Sabbo ādīpito loko,
sabbo loko padhūpito;
Sabbo pajjalito loko,
sabbo loko pakampito.

Akampitaṃ apajjalitaṃ,
aputhujjanasevitaṃ,
agati yattha mārassa —
tattha me nirato mano.

The entire world is in flames,
the entire world is going up in smoke;
the entire world is burning,
the entire world is vibrating.

But that which does not vibrate or burn,
which is experienced by the noble ones,
where death has no entry–
in that my mind delights.

Saṃyutta Nikāya 1.168
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 19, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 19, 2018  —  dīpa — the island

Tumhehi kiccamātappaṃ;
Akkhātāro Tathāgatā.
Paṭipannā pamokkhanti
jhāyino mārabandhanā.

You have to do your own work;
Enlightened Ones will only show the way.
Those who practise meditation
will free themselves from the chains of death.

Dhammapada 20.276

The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 18, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 18, 2018 — paṇḍita — wise, clever, skilled, circumspect, intelligent

Sace bhāyatha dukkhassa, sace vo dukkhamappiyaṃ,
mākattha pāpakaṃ kammaṃ, āvi vā yadi vā raho.
Sace ca pāpakaṃ kammaṃ, karissatha karotha vā,
Na vo dukkhā pamutyatthi:
upeccapi palāyataṃ.

If you fear pain, if you dislike pain,
don’t do an evil deed in open or secret.
If you’re doing or will do an evil deed,
you won’t escape pain:
it will catch you even as you run away.

Udāna 5.44
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 17, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 17, 2018 – nissanga — [nis+sanga] unattached, unobstructed, disinterested, unselfish

Gahakāraka, diṭṭhosi!
Puna gehaṃ na kāhasi.
Sabbā te phāsukā bhaggā gahakūṭaṃ visaṅkhataṃ.
Visaṅkhāragataṃ cittaṃ;
taṇhānaṃ khayamajjhagā.

O house-builder, you are seen!
You will not build this house again.
For your rafters are broken and your ridgepole shattered.
My mind has reached the Unconditioned;
I have attained the destruction of craving.

Dhammapada 11.154
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 16, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 16, 2018  —  sūcaka — an informer, slanderer

Māvoca pharusaṃ kañci,
vuttā paṭivadeyyu taṃ.
Dukkhā hi sārambhakathā,
paṭidaṇḍā phuseyyu taṃ.

Speak not harshly to anyone,
for those thus spoken to might retort.
Indeed, angry speech hurts,
and retaliation may overtake you.

Dhammapada 10.133
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 15, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 15, 2018  —  anoma — [an+oma] not inferior, superior, perfect, supreme

Mātā yathā niyaṃ
puttamāyusā ekaputtamanurakkhe,
evampi sabbabhūtesu
mānasaṃ bhāvaye aparimāṇaṃ.

As a mother would risk her life
to protect her child, her only child,
even so should one cultivate a limitless heart
with regard to all beings.

Sutta Nipāta 1.149
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 14, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 14, 2018  —  nīroga — free from disease, healthy, well, unhurt

Adhicetaso appamajjato,
munino monapathesu sikkhato:
Sokā na bhavanti tādino,
upasantassa sadā satīmato.

Exalted in mind & heedful,
the sage trained in sagacity’s ways:
One has no sorrows, one who is Such,
calmed & ever mindful.

Udāna 4.37
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 13, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 13, 2018  —  anāsava — free from the 4 intoxications

Abhittharetha kalyāṇe;
pāpā cittaṃ nivāraye.
Dandhañhi karoto puññaṃ,
pāpasmiṃ ramatī mano.

Hasten to do good;
restrain your mind from evil.
One who is slow in doing good,
that one’s mind delights in evil.

Dhammapada 9.116
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 12, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 12, 2018  —  anuṇṇata — not raised, not elated, not haughty, humble

Pathavisamo no virujjhati,
indakhilupamo tādi subbato,
rahadova apetakaddamo
saṃsārā na bhavanti tādino.

There is no more worldly existence for the wise one who,
like the earth, resents nothing,
who is firm as a high pillar
and as pure as a deep pool free from mud.

Dhammapada 7.95
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 11, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 11, 2018  —  ābhāsa — light, radiance; appearance

Gataddhino visokassa
vippamuttassa sabbadhi,
sabbaganthappahīnassa,
pariḷāho na vijjati.

The fever of passion exists not for one
who has completed the journey,
who is sorrowless and wholly set free,
and has broken all ties.

Dhammapada 7.90
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 10, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 10, 2018  — tathatā — state of being such, such-likeness, similarity, correspondence

Yathā naro āpagamotaritvā,
mahodakaṃ salilaṃ sīghasotaṃ,
so vuyhamāno anusotagāmī —
kiṃ so pare sakkhati tārayetuṃ?

If one going down into a river,
swollen and swiftly flowing,
is carried away by the current —
how can one help others across?

Sutta Nipāta 2.321
The Discourse Collection: Selected Texts from the Sutta Nipāta, translated by John D. Ireland

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 09, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 09, 2018  —  jita — conquered, subdued, mastered:

Appakā te manussesu, ye janā pāragāmino.
Athāyaṃ itarā pajā, tīramevānudhāvati.
Ye ca kho sammadakkhāte dhamme dhammānuvattino
te janā pāramessanti, maccudheyyaṃ suduttaraṃ.

Few among people are those who cross to the farther shore.
The rest, the bulk of people, only run up and down the hither bank.
But those who act according to the perfectly taught Dhamma
will cross the realm of Death, so difficult to cross.

Dhammapada 6.85, 6.86
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 08, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 08, 2018  —  nirodha — the cessation

Udakañhi nayanti nettikā;
usukārā namayanti tejanaṃ;
dāruṃ namayanti tacchakā;
attānaṃ damayanti paṇḍitā.

Irrigators regulate the rivers;
fletchers straighten the arrow shaft;
carpenters shape the wood;
the wise control themselves.

Dhammapada 6.80

The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 07, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 07, 2018  —  sacca — the truth

Dhammapīti sukhaṃ seti
vippasannena cetasā.
Ariyappavedite dhamme
sadā ramati paṇḍito.

One who drinks deep the Dhamma
lives happily with a tranquil mind.
The wise one ever delights in the Dhamma
made known by the Noble One (the Buddha).

Dhammapada 6.79
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 06, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 06, 2018  —  taraṇa — going across, passing over, traversing

Saddhā tarati oghaṃ,
appamādena aṇṇavaṃ.
Vīriyena dukkhamacceti.
Paññāya parisujjhati.

Through conviction one crosses over the flood.
Through heedfulness, the sea.
Through persistence one overcomes suffering & stress.
Through discernment a person is purified.

Sutta Nipāta 1.186
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 05, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 05, 2018  —  pahānāya — for the destruction of

Aññā hi lābhūpanisā,
aññā nibbānagāminī.
Evametaṃ abhiññāya,
bhikkhu buddhassa sāvako,
sakkāraṃ nābhinandeyya,
vivekamanubrūhaye.

One is the quest for worldly gain,
and quite another is the path to Nibbana.
Clearly understanding this,
let not the monk, the disciple of the Buddha,
be carried away by worldly acclaim,
but develop detachment instead.

Dhammapada 5.75
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 04, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 04, 2018  —  tejavant — splendid, powerful, majestic

Yassa nittiṇṇo paṅko,
Maddito kāmakaṇṭako,
Mohakkhayaṃ anuppatto
Sukhadukkhesu na vedhatī sa bhikkhū.

That bhikkhu who has crossed the mire,
Crushed the thorn of sensual desire,
And reached the destruction of delusion
Is not perturbed by pleasures and pains.

Udāna 3.22
The Udāna and the Itivuttaka, trans. John D. Ireland

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 03, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 03, 2018  —  anāghāta — freedom from anger or ill-will

Tañca kammaṃ kataṃ sādhu,
yaṃ katvā nānutappati,
yassa patīto sumano,
vipākaṃ paṭisevati.

Well done is that action of doing
which one repents not later,
and the fruit of which,
one reaps with delight and happiness.

Dhammapada 5.68
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 02, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 02, 2018  —  sukhuma — that which is delicate, or that which is fine, subtle, minute

Yāvajīvampi ce bālo, paṇḍitaṃ payirupāsati,
Na so dhammaṃ vijānāti
dabbī sūparasaṃ yathā.

Though all one’s life a fool associates with a wise person,
one no more comprehends the Truth
than a spoon tastes the flavor of the soup.

Dhammapada 5.64

The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for October 01, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for October 01, 2018  —  ñāya — method, truth, system, fitness, right manner, right conduct

Uṭṭhānenappamādena,
saṃyamena damena ca,
dīpaṃ kayirātha medhāvī
yaṃ ogho nābhikīrati.

By effort and heedfulness,
discipline and self-mastery,
let the wise one make for oneself
an island which no flood can overwhelm.

Dhammapada 2.25

The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 30, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 30, 2018 ñāṇa — knowledge, intelligence, insight, conviction, recognition

Sabhaggato vā parisaggato vā
ekassa veko na musā bhaṇeyya.
Na bhāṇaye bhaṇataṃ nānujaññā.
Sabbaṃ abhūtaṃ parivajjayeyya.

Having entered a royal court or a company of people
one should not speak lies.
One should not speak lies (oneself) nor incite others to do so.
One should completely avoid falsehood.

Sutta Nipāta 2.399

The Discourse Collection: Selected Texts from the Sutta Nipāta, translated by John D. Ireland

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 29, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 29, 2018  —  jātimant — of good birth, having natural or genuine qualities, noble, excellent

Saddhīdha vittaṃ purisassa seṭṭhaṃ
Dhammo suciṇṇo sukhamāvahāti.
Saccaṃ have sādutaraṃ rasānaṃ.
Paññājīviṃ jīvitamāhu seṭṭhaṃ.

Conviction is a person’s highest wealth.
Dhamma, when well-practiced, brings bliss.
Truth is the highest of tastes.
Living with discernment, one’s life is called best.

Sutta Nipāta 1.184
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 28, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 28, 2018  —  jotimant — luminous, endowed with light or splendour, bright, excellent (in knowledge)

Sukhakāmāni bhūtāni
yo daṇḍena vihiṃsati,
attano sukhamesāno,
pecca so na labhate sukhaṃ.

Sukhakāmāni bhūtāni
yo daṇḍena na hiṃsati,
attano sukhamesāno,
pecca so labhate sukhaṃ.

Whoever takes a stick
to beings desiring ease,
when one is looking for ease,
will meet with no ease after death.

Whoever doesn’t take a stick
to beings desiring ease,
when one is looking for ease,
will meet with ease after death.

Udāna 2.13
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 27, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 27, 2018  —  anabhijjhā — absence of covetousness or desire

Uṭṭhānavato satīmato
sucikammassa nisammakārino,
saññatassa dhammajīvino, appamattassa yasobhivaḍḍhati.

Ever grows the glory of one
who is energetic, mindful and pure in conduct,
discerning and self-controlled, righteous and heedful.

Dhammapada 2.24
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 26, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 26, 2018  — aṭala — solid, firm, strong

Te jhāyino sātatikā, niccaṃ daḷhaparakkamā,
phusanti dhīrā nibbānaṃ, yogakkhemaṃ anuttaraṃ.

The wise ones, ever meditative and steadfastly persevering,
alone experience Nibbana, the incomparable freedom from bondage.

Dhammapada 2.23
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 25, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 25, 2018  —  tapati — to shine, to be bright

Appamādo amatapadaṃ.
Pamādo maccuno padaṃ.
Appamattā na mīyanti.
Ye pamattā yathā matā.

Heedfulness is the path to the Deathless.
Heedlessness is the path to death.
The heedful die not.
The heedless are as if dead already.

Dhammapada 2.21

The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 24, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 24, 2018  —  titikkhā — endurance, forgiveness

Uṭṭhahatha! nisīdatha!
Daḷhaṃ sikkhatha santiyā.
Mā vo pamatte viññāya,
maccurājā amohayittha vasānuge.

Rouse yourself! Sit up!
Resolutely train yourself to attain peace.
Do not let the king of death, seeing you are careless,
lead you astray and dominate you.

Sutta Nipāta 2.334
The Discourse Collection: Selected Texts from the Sutta Nipāta, translated by John D. Ireland

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 23, 2018

āli Word a Day for September 23, 2018  — tāṇa — shelter, protection, refuge, esp. of shelter & peace offered by the dhamma

Appampi ce saṃhita bhāsamāno,
dhammassa hoti anudhammacārī,
rāgañca, dosañca, pahāya mohaṃ,
sammappajāno suvimuttacitto,
anupādiyāno idha vā huraṃ vā,
sa bhāgavā sāmaññassa hoti.

Little though one recites the sacred texts,
but puts the Teaching into practice,
forsaking lust, hatred, and delusion,
with true wisdom and emancipated mind,
clinging to nothing of this or any other world —
one indeed partakes of the blessings of a holy life.

Dhammapada 1.20
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 22, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 22, 2018  —  taranga — a wave

Sukhā virāgatā loke,
Kāmānaṃ samatikkamo;
Asmimānassa yo vinayo —
etaṃ ve paramaṃ sukhaṃ.

Blissful is passionlessness in the world,
The overcoming of sensual desires;
But the abolition of the conceit I am —
That is truly the supreme bliss.

Udāna 2.11
The Udāna and the Itivuttaka, trans. John D. Ireland

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 21, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 21, 2018  —  tappara — quite given to or intent upon, diligent, devoted

Bahumpi ce saṃhita bhāsamāno,
na takkaro hoti naro pamatto,
gopova gāvo gaṇayaṃ paresaṃ,
na bhāgavā sāmaññassa hoti.

Much though one recites the sacred texts,
but acts not accordingly,
that heedless one is like a cowherd
who only counts the cows of others —
one does not partake of the blessings of the holy life.

Dhammapada 1.19
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for September 20, 2018

Pāli Word a Day for September 20, 2018  —  anuvicarita — reflected, pondered over, thought out

Idha modati pecca modati;
katapuñño ubhayattha modati.
So modati so pamodati,
disvā kammavisuddhimattano.

The doer of good rejoices here and hereafter;
one rejoices in both the worlds.
One rejoices and exults,
recollecting one’s own pure deeds.

Dhammapada 1.16

The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita