Cecil the Lion, Regulus, Leo, cosmic living

Tara Greene,Tarot Reader, Astrology, Psychic

The world-wide coverage and outrage over the horrible murder of Cecil the Lion in Zimbabwe by Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer who cruelly lured the protected lion, shot him with arrows and injuring him instead of killing him. The poor regal King of beasts suffered for 40 hours until he was found. Palmer shot him with a rifle, beheaded and skinned him and took his body parts for a Trophy. Cecil did not die in vain, no. He has taken one for the team, he is actually the Lion acting as the sacrificial lamb. Rudolph Steiner, the great mystic wrote a lot about the Solar Lion.

Everything is symbolic and we are living in heightened archetypal awareness.  

Venus Turned Retrograde exactly on the Fixed Star Regulus at Zero degrees of the VIRGO the “do Right” Goddess  and what happens down below? 

The “Fixed Star” Regulus, in the Constellation of LEO…

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The Science of Stress and How Our Emotions Affect Our Susceptibility to Burnout and Disease by Maria Popova

How your memories impact your immune system, why moving is one of the most stressful life-events, and what your parents have to do with your predisposition to PTSD.

I had lived thirty good years before enduring my first food poisoning — odds quite fortunate in the grand scheme of things, but miserably unfortunate in the immediate experience of it. I found myself completely incapacitated to erect the pillars of my daily life — too cognitively foggy to read and write, too physically weak to work out or even meditate. The temporary disability soon elevated the assault on my mind and body to a new height of anguish: an intense experience of stress. Even as I consoled myself with Nabokov’s exceptionally florid account of food poisoning, I couldn’t shake the overwhelming malaise that had engulfed me — somehow, a physical illness had completely colored my psychoemotional reality.

This experience, of course, is far from uncommon. Long before scientists began shedding light on how our minds and bodies actually affect one another, an intuitive understanding of this dialogue between the body and the emotions, or feelings, emerged and permeated our very language: We use “feeling sick” as a grab-bag term for both the sensory symptoms — fever, fatigue, nausea — and the psychological malaise, woven of emotions like sadness and apathy.

Pre-modern medicine, in fact, has recognized this link between disease and emotion for millennia. Ancient Greek, Roman, and Indian Ayurvedic physicians all enlisted the theory of the four humors — blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm — in their healing practices, believing that imbalances in these four visible secretions of the body caused disease and were themselves often caused by the emotions. These beliefs are fossilized in our present language —melancholy comes from the Latin words for “black” (melan) and “bitter bile” (choler), and we think of a melancholic person as gloomy or embittered; aphlegmatic person is languid and impassive, for phlegm makes one lethargic.

Chart of the four humors from a 1495 medical textbook by Johannes de Ketham

And then French philosopher and mathematician René Descartes came along in the seventeenth century, taking it upon himself to eradicate the superstitions that fueled the religious wars of the era by planting the seed of rationalism. But the very tenets that laid the foundation of modern science — the idea that truth comes only from what can be visibly ascertained and proven beyond doubt — severed this link between the physical body and the emotions; those mysterious and fleeting forces, the biological basis of which the tools of modern neuroscience are only just beginning to understand, seemed to exist entirely outside the realm of what could be examined with the tools of rationalism.

For nearly three centuries, the idea that our emotions could impact our physical health remained scientific taboo — setting out to fight one type of dogma, Descartes had inadvertently created another, which we’re only just beginning to shake off. It was only in the 1950s that Austrian-Canadian physician and physiologist Hans Selye pioneered the notion of stress as we now know it today, drawing the scientific community’s attention to the effects of stress on physical health and popularizing the concept around the world. (In addition to his scientific dedication, Selye also understood the branding component of any successful movement and worked tirelessly to include the word itself in dictionaries around the world; today, “stress” is perhaps the word pronounced most similarly in the greatest number of major languages.)

But no researcher has done more to illuminate the invisible threads that weave mind and body together than Dr. Esther Sternberg. Her groundbreaking work on the link between the central nervous system and the immune system, exploring how immune molecules made in the blood can trigger brain function that profoundly affects our emotions, has revolutionized our understanding of the integrated being we call a human self. In the immeasurably revelatory The Balance Within: The Science Connecting Health and Emotions (public library), Sternberg examines the interplay of our emotions and our physical health, mediated by that seemingly nebulous yet, it turns out, remarkably concrete experience called stress.

Esther Sternberg by Steve Barrett

With an eye to modern medicine’s advances in cellular and molecular biology, which have made it possible to measure how our nervous system and our hormones affect our susceptibility to diseases as varied as depression, arthritis, AIDS, and chronic fatigue syndrome, Sternberg writes:

By parsing these chemical intermediaries, we can begin to understand the biological underpinnings of how emotions affect diseases…

The same parts of the brain that control the stress response … play an important role in susceptibility and resistance to inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. And since it is these parts of the brain that also play a role in depression, we can begin to understand why it is that many patients with inflammatory diseases may also experience depression at different times in their lives… Rather than seeing the psyche as the source of such illnesses, we are discovering that while feelings don’t directly cause or cure disease, the biological mechanisms underlying them may cause or contribute to disease. Thus, many of the nerve pathways and molecules underlying both psychological responses and inflammatory disease are the same, making predisposition to one set of illnesses likely to go along with predisposition to the other. The questions need to be rephrased, therefore, to ask which of the many components that work together to create emotions also affect that other constellation of biological events, immune responses, which come together to fight or to cause disease. Rather than asking if depressing thoughts can cause an illness of the body, we need to ask what the molecules and nerve pathways are that cause depressing thoughts. And then we need to ask whether these affect the cells and molecules that cause disease.

[…]

We are even beginning to sort out how emotional memories reach the parts of the brain that control the hormonal stress response, and how such emotions can ultimately affect the workings of the immune system and thus affect illnesses as disparate as arthritis and cancer. We are also beginning to piece together how signals from the immune system can affect the brain and the emotional and physical responses it controls: the molecular basis of feeling sick. In all this, the boundaries between mind and body are beginning to blur.

Indeed, the relationship between memory, emotion, and stress is perhaps the most fascinating aspect of Sternberg’s work. She considers how we deal with the constant swirl of inputs and outputs as we move through the world, barraged by a stream of stimuli and sensations:

Every minute of the day and night we feel thousands of sensations that might trigger a positive emotion such as happiness, or a negative emotion such as sadness, or no emotion at all: a trace of perfume, a light touch, a fleeting shadow, a strain of music. And there are thousands of physiological responses, such as palpitations or sweating, that can equally accompany positive emotions such as love, or negative emotions such as fear, or can happen without any emotional tinge at all. What makes these sensory inputs and physiological outputs emotions is the charge that gets added to them somehow, somewhere in our brains. Emotions in their fullest sense comprise all of these components. Each can lead into the black box and produce an emotional experience, or something in the black box can lead out to an emotional response that seems to come from nowhere.

Illustration from ‘Neurocomic,’ a graphic novel about how the brain works. Click image for more.

Memory, it turns out, is one of the major factors mediating the dialogue between sensation and emotional experience. Our memories of past experience become encoded into triggers that act as switchers on the rail of psychoemotional response, directing the incoming train of present experience in the direction of one emotional destination or another.

Sternberg writes:

Mood is not homogeneous like cream soup. It is more like Swiss cheese, filled with holes. The triggers are highly specific, tripped by sudden trails of memory: a faint fragrance, a few bars of a tune, a vague silhouette that tapped into a sad memory buried deep, but not completely erased. These sensory inputs from the moment float through layers of time in the parts of the brain that control memory, and they pull out with them not only reminders of sense but also trails of the emotions that were first connected to the memory. These memories become connected to emotions, which are processed in other parts of the brain: the amygdala for fear, the nucleus accumbens for pleasure — those same parts that the anatomists had named for their shapes. And these emotional brain centers are linked by nerve pathways to the sensory parts of the brain and to the frontal lobe and hippocampus — the coordinating centers of thought and memory.

The same sensory input can trigger a negative emotion or a positive one, depending on the memories associated with it.

Illustration by Maurice Sendak from ‘Open House for Butterflies’ by Ruth Krauss. Click image for more.

This is where stress comes in — much like memory mediates how we interpret and respond to various experiences, a complex set of biological and psychological factors determine how we respond to stress. Some types of stress can be stimulating and invigorating, mobilizing us into action and creative potency; others can be draining and incapacitating, leaving us frustrated and hopeless. This dichotomy of good vs. bad stress, Sternberg notes, is determined by the biology undergirding our feelings — by the dose and duration of the stress hormones secreted by the body in response to the stressful stimulus. She explains the neurobiological machinery behind this response:

As soon as the stressful event occurs, it triggers the release of the cascade of hypothalamic, pituitary, and adrenal hormones — the brain’s stress response. It also triggers the adrenal glands to release epinephrine, or adrenaline, and the sympathetic nerves to squirt out the adrenaline-like chemical norepinephrine all over the body: nerves that wire the heart, and gut, and skin. So, the heart is driven to beat faster, the fine hairs of your skin stand up, you sweat, you may feel nausea or the urge to defecate. But your attention is focused, your vision becomes crystal clear, a surge of power helps you run — these same chemicals released from nerves make blood flow to your muscles, preparing you to sprint.

All this occurs quickly. If you were to measure the stress hormones in your blood or saliva, they would already be increased within three minutes of the event. In experimental psychology tests, playing a fast-paced video game will make salivary cortisol increase and norepinephrine spill over into venous blood almost as soon as the virtual battle begins. But if you prolong the stress, by being unable to control it or by making it too potent or long-lived, and these hormones and chemicals still continue to pump out from nerves and glands, then the same molecules that mobilized you for the short haul now debilitate you.

These effects of stress exist on a bell curve — that is, some is good, but too much becomes bad: As the nervous system secretes more and more stress hormones, performance increases, but up to a point; after that tipping point, performance begins to suffer as the hormones continue to flow. What makes stress “bad” — that is, what makes it render us more pervious to disease — is the disparity between the nervous system and immune system’s respective pace. Sternberg explains:

The nervous system and the hormonal stress response react to a stimulus in milliseconds, seconds, or minutes. The immune system takes parts of hours or days. It takes much longer than two minutes for immune cells to mobilize and respond to an invader, so it is unlikely that a single, even powerful, short-lived stress on the order of moments could have much of an effect on immune responses. However, when the stress turns chronic, immune defenses begin to be impaired. As the stressful stimulus hammers on, stress hormones and chemicals continue to pump out. Immune cells floating in this milieu in blood, or passing through the spleen, or growing up in thymic nurseries never have a chance to recover from the unabated rush of cortisol. Since cortisol shuts down immune cells’ responses, shifting them to a muted form, less able to react to foreign triggers, in the context of continued stress we are less able to defend and fight when faced with new invaders. And so, if you are exposed to, say, a flu or common cold virus when you are chronically stressed out, your immune system is less able to react and you become more susceptible to that infection.

Illustration from ‘Donald and the…’ by Edward Gorey. Click image for more.

Extended exposure to stress, especially to a variety of stressors at the same time — any combination from the vast existential menu of life-events like moving, divorce, a demanding job, the loss of a loved one, and even ongoing childcare — adds up a state of extreme exhaustion that leads to what we call burnout.

Sternberg writes:

Members of certain professions are more prone to burnout than others — nurses and teachers, for example, are among those at highest risk. These professionals are faced daily with caregiving situations in their work lives, often with inadequate pay, inadequate help in their jobs, and with too many patients or students in their charge. Some studies are beginning to show that burnt-out patients may have not only psychological burnout, but also physiological burnout: a flattened cortisol response and inability to respond to any stress with even a slight burst of cortisol. In other words, chronic unrelenting stress can change the stress response itself. And it can change other hormone systems in the body as well.

One of the most profound such changes affects the reproductive system — extended periods of stress can shut down the secretion of reproductive hormones in both men and women, resulting in lower fertility. But the effects are especially perilous for women — recurring and extended episodes of depression result in permanent changes in bone structure, increasing the risk of osteoporosis. In other words, we register stress literally in our bones.

Art from ‘Evolution’ by Patrick Gries and Jean-Baptiste de Panafieu. Click image for more.

But stress isn’t a direct causal function of the circumstances we’re in — what either amplifies or ameliorates our experience of stress is, once again, memory. Sternberg writes:

Our perception of stress, and therefore our response to it, is an ever-changing thing that depends a great deal on the circumstances and settings in which we find ourselves. It depends on previous experience and knowledge, as well as on the actual event that has occurred. And it depends on memory, too.

The most acute manifestation of how memory modulates stress is post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. For striking evidence of how memory encodes past experience into triggers, which then catalyze present experience, Sternberg points to research by psychologist Rachel Yehuda, who found both Holocaust survivors and their first-degree relatives — that is, children and siblings — exhibited a similar hormonal stress response.

This, Sternberg points out, could be a combination of nature and nurture — the survivors, as young parents for whom the trauma was still fresh, may well have subconsciously taught their children a common style of stress-responsiveness; but it’s also possible that these automatic hormonal stress responses permanently changed the parents’ biology and were transmitted via DNA to their children. Once again, memory encodes stress into our very bodies. Sternberg considers the broader implications:

Stress need not be on the order of war, rape, or the Holocaust to trigger at least some elements of PTSD. Common stresses that we all experience can trigger the emotional memory of a stressful circumstance — and all its accompanying physiological responses. Prolonged stress — such as divorce, a hostile workplace, the end of a relationship, or the death of a loved one — can all trigger elements of PTSD.

Among the major stressors — which include life-events expected to be on the list, such as divorce and the death of a loved one — is also one somewhat unexpected situation, at least to those who haven’t undergone it: moving. Sternberg considers the commonalities between something as devastating as death and something as mundane as moving:

One is certainly loss — the loss of someone or something familiar. Another is novelty — finding oneself in a new and unfamiliar place because of the loss. Together these amount to change: moving away from something one knows and toward something one doesn’t.

[…]

An unfamiliar environment is a universal stressor to nearly all species, no matter how developed or undeveloped.

In the remainder of the thoroughly illuminating The Balance Within, Sternberg goes on to explore the role of interpersonal relationships in both contributing to stress and shielding us from it, how the immune system changes our moods, and what we can do to harness these neurobiological insights in alleviating our experience of the stressors with which every human life is strewn.

Coming Soon – Blue Moon On July 31, 2015

Blue Moon

July 31, 2015  is a blue moon.The second full moon for the  month, the first one was on July 2 and the second one, which is called the Blue moon will be on July 31, 2015.

According to Wikipedia

A blue moon is an additional full moon that appears in a subdivision of a year, either the third of four full moons in a season or, a second full moon in a month of the common calendar.

The phrase has nothing to do with the actual color of the moon, although a literal “blue moon” (the moon appearing with a tinge of blue) may occur in certain atmospheric conditions; e.g., when there are volcanic eruptions or when exceptionally large fires leave particles in the atmosphere. This phenomenon is specific to calendars. Lunar calendars like the Indian national calendar always have one full moon a month.

The term has traditionally referred to an ‘extra’ moon, where a year which normally has 12 moons has 13 instead. The ‘blue moon’ reference is applied to the 3rd moon in a season with 4 moons,[1] thus correcting the timing of the last month of a season that would have otherwise been expected too early. This happens every two to three years (seven times in the Metonic cycle of 19 years).[2] The March 1946 issue of Sky & Telescope misinterpreted the traditional definition, which led to the modern colloquial misunderstanding that a blue moon is a second full moon in a single solar calendar month with no seasonal link.

Owing to the rarity of a blue moon, the term “blue moon” is used colloquially to mean a rare event, as in the phrase “once in a blue moon”.

One lunation (an average lunar cycle) is 29.53 days. There are about 365.24 days in a tropical year. Therefore, about 12.37 lunations (365.24 days divided by 29.53 days) occur in a tropical year. In the widely used Gregorian calendar, there are 12 months (the word month is derived from moon) in a year, and normally there is one full moon each month. Each calendar year contains roughly 11 days more than the number of days in 12 lunar cycles. The extra days accumulate, so every two or three years (7 times in the 19-year Metonic cycle), there is an extra full moon. The extra moon necessarily falls in one of the four seasons, giving that season four full moons instead of the usual three, and, hence, a blue moon.

Origin of the term:

The suggestion has been made that the term “blue moon” for “intercalary month” arose by folk etymology, the “blue” replacing the no-longer-understood belewe, ‘to betray’. The original meaning would then have been “betrayer moon”, referring to a full moon that would “normally” (in years without an intercalary month) be the full moon of spring, while in an intercalary year, it was “traitorous” in the sense that people would have had to continue fasting for another month in accordance with the season of Lent.

The earliest recorded English usage of the term blue moon is found in an anti-clerical pamphlet (attacking the Roman clergy, and cardinal Thomas Wolsey in particular) by two converted Greenwich friars, William Roy and Jerome Barlow, published in 1528 under the title Rede me and be nott wrothe, for I say no thynge but trothe. The relevant passage reads:

O churche men are wyly foxes […] Yf they say the mone is blewe / We must beleve that it is true / Admittynge their interpretacion. (ed. Arber 1871 p. 114)
It is not clear from the context that this refers to intercalation; the context of the passage is a dialogue between two priest’s servants, spoken by the character “Jeffrey” (a brefe dialoge betwene two preste’s servauntis, named Watkyn and Ieffraye). The intention may simply be that Jeffrey makes an absurd statement, “the moon is blue”, to make the point that priests require laymen to believe in statements even if they are patently false. But in the above interpretation of “betrayer moon”, Jeffrey may also be saying that it is up to the priests to say when Lent will be delayed, by announcing “blue moons” which laymen have no means to verify.

The most literal meaning of blue moon is when the moon (not necessarily a full moon) appears to a casual observer to be unusually bluish, which is a rare event. The effect can be caused by smoke or dust particles in the atmosphere, as has happened after forest fires in Sweden and Canada in 1950 and 1951, and after the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883, which caused the moon to appear blue for nearly two years. Other less potent volcanoes have also turned the moon blue. People saw blue moons in 1983 after the eruption of the El Chichón volcano in Mexico, and there are reports of blue moons caused by Mount St. Helens in 1980 and Mount Pinatubo in 1991.In the Antarctic diary of Robert Falcon Scott for July 11, 1911 his entry says, “…the air thick with snow, and the moon a vague blue.”  On that date the moon phase would have looked full.

On September 23, 1950, several muskeg fires that had been smoldering for several years in Alberta, Canada, suddenly blew up into major—and very smoky—fires. Winds carried the smoke eastward and southward with unusual speed, and the conditions of the fire produced large quantities of oily droplets of just the right size (about 1 micrometre in diameter) to scatter red and yellow light. Wherever the smoke cleared enough so that the sun was visible, it was lavender or blue. Ontario, Canada, and much of the east coast of the United States were affected by the following day, and two days later, observers in Britain reported an indigo sun in smoke-dimmed skies, followed by an equally blue moon that evening.

The key to a blue moon is having lots of particles slightly wider than the wavelength of red light (0.7 micrometer)—and no other sizes present. It is rare, but volcanoes sometimes produce such clouds, as do forest fires. Ash and dust clouds thrown into the atmosphere by fires and storms usually contain a mixture of particles with a wide range of sizes, with most smaller than 1 micrometer, and they tend to scatter blue light. This kind of cloud makes the moon turn red; thus red moons are far more common than blue moons.

SOURCE : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_moon
(Disclaimer: I do not own the copyright to the image/photo neither do I claim ownership of the same. Any information regarding the owner of the photo/image will be much  appreciated so that I can give the proper credit)

Overcoming Obstacles ~ Boundaries Can Set You Free

candle_lotus

Here’s a story about overcoming obstacles …

Like many people, Jane started meditating because she knew it would improve her life. When it was new and the enthusiasm was there, she found it easy.

Once the novelty wore off, however, Jane wasn’t that excited about meditation anymore.

It didn’t feel that great. She tired of it easily. She couldn’t stop wondering what was happening on Facebook.

She quickly found her meditations went from 30 minutes a day to 30 seconds. “I’m just not in the flow, today,” Jane would say as she pulled out the IPad to check her emails.

This approach of “I’ll do something when it’s going good but quit when it’s not going so well” is destroying people’s will power – whether they are trying to meditate, paint a portrait or get in shape.

That’s why I tell people to time their meditations. Set an alarm. Have a goal. This forces you to say to yourself: “It doesn’t matter if my meditation is good or bad… I’m just going to finish it.”

Whatever you want to do to improve your life — set a timer.

Take it a step further by keeping a log or journal – tracking your progress.

Now, once you overcome this barrier to your will power then an inner force (like a mental “virus” that tries to stop you from living a fulfilling life) will use another far more cunning tactic…

Let’s say Jane has committed to meditating five minutes each day whether she’s in the mood or not. It’s a little difficult at first, but after a few weeks she’s really enjoying it.

Then one day she’s experiencing a very deep meditation and doesn’t want to stop when the alarm goes off. So she keeps on meditating as long as she continues to feel this deep state of peace.

Sounds good, right? Not so fast…

Now, when will she actually stop her meditation since the alarm has already gone off? When her meditation starts going bad. That’s when.

So now Jane’s giving up. Again.

I recommend that you meditate for whatever time you know you can consistently commit to every day. Then if you’re having a great meditation one day and you want to meditate more, wait until the timer goes and set it again for another five minutes (or whatever time you decide).

The same goes for exercise. If you’re on a runner’s high after two miles then set another goal. Maybe aim for another mile. Or do the same route again. But don’t just keep on running until you don’t feel like it anymore.

Otherwise you’ll let the virus continue to dictate your actions and sabotage our life.

Keeping Your Eye On The Gold Means Committing To A Goal

goals

There are many tips and tricks out there on how to best set and manage your goals and at times it can all seem a bit…overwhelming.

The most important tip anyone can ever give you on goal-setting is this:To just set a goal.

Before you set your goal, it is just a dream, an idea…something vague in the back of your mind. Once you state it clearly and write it down, your play is set in motion.

Setting your goal is the first step toward success and thus the most important one.

After that, the Universe will align and conspire to assist you. Doors will open, opportunities will arise and things will start to fall into place.

Before you know it momentum will be carrying you forward.

Of course, after you get started you can refine your goal, strategize how you will keep moving down the field and fine tune how you handle the challenges you’ll encounter along the way.

But you don’t need to know all these things to call the first play… just call it and get started.

As the old saying goes, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step.”

Have A Magnificent Monday!

Mercury conjoins Sun 2015-07-23

Grandtrines

2015-07-23 Mercury conjoins Sun:

Today (Thursday, July 23rd) is a bit of an odd day.  TWO Hele aspects (a “key” perhaps?) are present indicating that people are polarizing (really, CONTINUING to polarize) on multiple issues.  TWO interlocking Rosetta aspects are also present (a “key” perhaps?), and this indicates more polarization (in addition to the Hele aspects) but short-lived alliances that may be characterized by treachery.  (e.g. Undercover police infiltrating civil rights groups; undercover civil rights activists infiltrating police; etc. ad infinitum ad nauseum.  Very much “Spy versus Spy.”)

The gift of today is the GREAT ideas that you will get, and maybe some GREAT conversations.  Write it all down with an eye to act on some, most or all of it later.  (The time to act may not be for a few days.  Let things “sort themselves out.”  But, chatter with your closest allies might be worthwhile.)

Most…

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Aloha Uhane Nui Au ~ Celebrate Your Spirit Greatness!

girl-803934_1280

YOU ARE SPIRIT GREATNESS … ALOHA UHANE NUI AU!

When you’re different, sometimes you don’t see the millions of people who accept you for what you are. All you notice is the person who doesn’t.


DO YOU REALIZE THAT YOU ARE LIGHT?  ALOHA THIS …

1. At least 5 people in this world love you so much they would die for you.
2. At least 15 people in this world love you in some way.
3. The only reason anyone would ever hate you is because they want to be just like you.
4. A smile from you can bring happiness to anyone, even if they don’t like you.
5. Every night, SOMEONE thinks about you before they go to sleep.
6. You mean the world to someone.
7. If not for you, someone may not be living.
8. You are special and unique.
9. Someone that you don’t even know exists loves you.
10. When you make the biggest mistake ever, something good comes from it.
11. When you think the world has turned its back on you, take a look: you most likely turned your back on the world.
12. When you think you have no chance of getting what you want, you probably won’t get it, but if you believe in yourself, probably, sooner or later, you will get it.
13. Always remember the compliments you received. Forget about the rude remarks.
14. Always tell someone how you feel about them; you will feel much better when they know.
15. If you have a great friend, take the time to let them know that they are great.

Mercury Trine Saturn 2015-07-22

Grandtrines

2015-07-22 Mercury Trine Saturn

Thought you were done with the job on Tuesday?  Not so.  Mercury Trine Saturn tells you have more work to do, and you are facing a deadline.  Worse yet, you are torn between work (Saturn) and play (Jupiter) by a Thor’s Hammer with Vesta (traditions usually, but sometimes kinky sex) at its apex.

All work and no play… …but Venus into Virgo still says work, Work, WORK!  Try to decide without losing your temper; focus that energy into something productive whether it is work or play or some mix of both.

Here is the chart:

2015-07-22 Mercury Trine Saturn (Thor's Hammer)

[Click Image to Enlarge]

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A Breathing Practice To Help Ground Your Root Chakra, by Leigh Tremaine

breathing-meditation

MBG  |  Pranayama is a powerful, focused breathing technique that directs our energy flow for healing and self-realization. In the book Infinite Mind: Science of the Human Vibrations of Consciousness, Dr. Valerie Hunt conducted an important study in directing the flow of energy within the subtle body.

By studying the human biofield, she found that people who lacked vitality or felt ungrounded, were often missing a certain frequency of energy associated with the same frequency as the Root Chakra (Muladhara).

Ungrounded states, where we do not necessarily feel within our body, lack physical vitality and represent an imbalance in our energy spectrum. If our Root Chakra energy is low, we may not be drawing enough energy from the Earth. This can often cause forms of disassociation or numbness.

Hypo states such as hypothyroidism, hypoglycemia and hypotension, as well as weakness, fatigue, depression, and general under-functioning of the body, may be an indication that the body has insufficient subtle energy in the grounding realm.

Using Pranayama For Grounding + Vitality

While pranayama is often thought of as breath-work, it is also about energy attunement, energy breathing, and energy direction. What we are intending is to draw in energy to replace the missing frequency in the biofield. In this case of being ungrounded, the color red (also associated with the Root Chakra) is missing from the spectrum of the energy biofield.

The Practice

Find a place where you will not be disturbed and adopt either a seated or standing position, preferably with the soles of your feet on the ground. Barefoot in nature is good, though not necessary. Mountain Pose (Tadasana) is great for this, provided you do not suffer from low blood pressure or any condition that limits you from standing for long periods of time.

Set your intention for the practice, which is to become more grounded, and center yourself by relaxing, turning inward to your inner stillness, and placing your attention on your breath. You can also use the practice of ujjayi breath for deeper focus, and to generate a bit of heat. Spend a few moments following your breath, inhaling through your nose, allowing your breath to expand your lungs, ribcage, and belly before exhaling through your nose.

Continue with the breathing and use the following visualization technique.

Imagine roots spreading down from the soles of your feet to the center of the Earth, anchoring you to the ground.

As you inhale, imagine that you are inhaling red vital energy from the Earth, up your roots, and up through the soles of your feet. Continue to breathe this red energy upward through your legs and into your pelvic floor and the spinning, rich red vortex of your Root Chakra where you sense the energy being absorbed and distributed to your body. Hold your breath for a brief natural pause on the end of the exhale if you wish.

Exhale from the Root Chakra down your legs, through your feet, and down your roots to the center of the Earth.

Repeat this several times, focusing on how grounded your legs and hips feel with the energy flow. Feel the stimulating effects on your body.

Optional exercise: Breathe the red Earth energy even further up the body and into the remaining chakras. You can also breathe into any areas associated with hypo-functioning, feeling the stimulating effects of the red Earth energy upon it. Exhale back down to the center of the Earth and repeat for a few cycles of breath.

If you have a medical condition, be sure to contact your healthcare provider before beginning a pranayama practice.

Fish of Hawaii: Kihikihi

HONILIMA

photo by Mila Zinkova taken in Kona photo by Mila Zinkova taken in Kona

The Moorish Idol, Zanclus cornutus, called Kinikihi in Hawaiian, stands out in contrasting bands of black, white and yellow. They have relatively small fins so they prefer shallow reef waters and lagoons. Like the butterfly fishes, Moorish Idols mate for life. They often school as juveniles. Adult males tend to be aggressive toward one another.

They grow up to eight inches in length and are not long lived in captivity although they are popular aquarium fish.

The Moors in Africa believe them to be fish of happiness and with their colorful bodies and graceful patterns you can see why they bring a smile.

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Egyptian Tree of Life

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The civilization of Egypt as we know spans back thousands of years to the days when the last great glaciers in the world were melting (10,000 BC). This information, as many of you may know, has been systematically removed and ignored from nearly every history book written in modern times. The Egyptians were an incredibly aware and spiritual society, which had deeply entrenched beliefs about reality as we perceive it as well as the realities that most of us are not aware of.

Spirituality played a huge role in the lives of Egyptians, and this is depicted in the hieroglyphs that they have left behind on the walls of their tombs or in the fragments of papyrus that are unearthed. Uncovered in this forgotten language are references to the tree of life. I am sure many of you know what I am referring to, the plant Acacia Nilotica. A tree that grows abundantly along the Nile River and was glorified by the Egyptians.

Acacia Nilotica contains Dimethyltryptamine, or DMT. DMT is not a rare topic amidst the articles on Collective Evolution and I advise all of you to check out the articles about the mind-blowing experiences that derive from DMT trips.  This is the same compound that is used in shamanic rituals in the Amazon with the drink Ayahuasca. Today, the idea that DMT can further ones experience on earth as well as having many healing qualities (both physical and mental), is slowly becoming more and more recognized. At this point I affirm that we are just at the beginning of a journey that many civilizations have taken before us, the Egyptians included.

Acacia Nilotica is portrayed hugely in Egyptian mythology. It is referred to as the tree of life, and from under this tree the first gods of Egypt were born. Osiris, god of the underworld, rebirth and the spirit was also born from an Acacia Nilotica tree. Osiris is also believed to live inside the spirit of all Acacia Nilotica trees. This is a very similar belief as held by the Amazonian Shamans and the people who have experienced Ayahuasca. A huge majority of DMT users talk about the “mother spirit” who guides the individual on the trip and teaches them what they need to learn on that specific trip. I believe that the Egyptians partook in the Acacia trip, and this was seen in the same light as the way Native Amazonians see Ayahuasca.

DMT would have only been used for spiritual purposes, in order to gain enlightenment and talk to the “gods.” In their case the guiding spirit that they found in their trips was Osiris. It is interesting to note that on the outer-body experience that is associated with DMT many people have found themselves seeing deceased friends and family, therefore Acacia Nilotica is a fitting symbol of the underworld and the spirit. The majority of DMT users also find a sense of rebirth after their trips, also being a fitting characteristic of the Acacia Nilotica. In modern archaeology of Egypt, Acacia Nilotica has been found in a huge percentage of the tombs unearthed.  I find it highly unlikely the Egyptians did not recognize the uses of this plant and I believe the evidence speaks for itself.

Yet Acacia Nilotica was not just revered in Egypt. The plant grew throughout the middle-east and its symbolism exists even to this day. To the east of Egypt, Judaism flourished, and once again Acacia Nilotica has huge symbolism. In the book of Moses, it is said that the tree that was set afire in front of Moses was an Acacia Nilotica tree. This is fitting as the Acacia can be found in over 3 different sub-species (all containing DMT) in the Jordan Valley and Sinai Desert. In both Hebrew and Judaism, the Acacia was recognized as Sacred and was revered as a building material saved only for temples and the likes. According to Judaism, the ark of the covenant was made of Acacia Nilotica. Again I believe that Judaism was heavily influenced by DMT and its connection to the “spirit world.” In pre-Islamic Mecca, the goddess of their religion was also Acacia Nilotica and was so similar to the Egyptian beliefs around Osiris that there is nothing really to explain on the matter.

Moving forward through history to the modern day, Acacia Nilotica is still revered in society by its “Elite.” Since its founding the Freemasons have placed heavy reverence on the Acacia Nilotica, claiming that is sacred properties of the tree represent the purity of the soul. The Freemasons claim that they received this information from the last of the great Egyptian thinkers. If the Freemasons are really some sort of utopian superpower in the world, it is clear why Acacia Nilotica is rarely recognized as a Psychedelic. If the majority of the world were to experience the spiritual journey users undertake on DMT, they would no longer be bound by the chains of the ego or fear. As Aldous Huxley explains in his book ‘Doors of Perception,’ the world of Men and Women would be rid of the religious symbolism and become one with each other and in-tune with the world around them.

I think that a substance so revered in such crucial times in Spiritual history has nearly been lost. I believe that a resurgence of the spiritual art of using Acacia Nilotica for its DMT characteristics would help in the Spiritual path we are fighting to stay upon and would strengthen the consciousness of our society. I do not think that it is mere coincidence that this substance has been chosen by these civilizations to symbolize purity, rebirth, spirituality and the underworld. If you would like to do more research on DMT as well as Acacia Nilotica I would recommend the book ‘Gnostic Visions: Uncovering the Greatest Secret of the Ancient World’ by Luke Myers.